Keep Your Cut Flowers Looking Great for Longer - The Habitat
The Habitat
Home
Share to PinterestKeep Your Cut Flowers Looking Great for Longer
Share to PinterestKeep Your Cut Flowers Looking Great for Longer
Advertisement

Cut flowers can be snipped for your own garden or bought from the florist or grocery store. They make a beautiful addition to any kitchen, dining, or coffee table, and they're an excellent gift for just about any occasion.

Most people know the downside to cut flowers is how short their lifespan is once they've been removed from the soil. Luckily, some tricks can keep your bouquet fresh and looking stunning for as long as possible.

01

Choosing the best flowers

Share to Pinterest

Although you can put any cut flower into a vase, some varieties fade and wilt quicker than others. Some of the best flowers for cut arrangements are

  • carnations
  • delphinium
  • English lavender
  • lilies
  • roses
  • sunflowers

Annual varieties — as opposed to perennials — are usually best for cut arrangements, as their blooming periods are much longer.

Advertisement
02

Harvest garden flowers correctly

Share to Pinterest

If your freshly cut flowers are coming straight out of your garden, there is a correct way to harvest them to ensure they will not wilt as fast. Harvest them in the morning, when temperatures are still cool and the blooms are holding the most water they will all day. Flowers picked on a hot afternoon are more likely to wilt faster.

Advertisement
03

Give your flowers a snip

Share to Pinterest

It is a good practice to cut your fresh flowers as soon as you get them home. Flowers have a vascular system within their stem, meaning that this is how they draw up water and nutrients. Cutting the flower's stem allows maximum water absorption. Use sharp scissors or pruning shears, and cut at a diagonal, snipping at least one inch off before you place them in water.

Advertisement
04

Pruning your cut flowers

Share to Pinterest

Snip off any leaves below the waterline; this not only makes your bouquet look better but also prevents bacterial growth. Some flowers, such as roses, have guard petals that prevent your flower from fully opening. You can remove these petals if you wish to see your flower in full bloom.

Inspect your bouquet daily to see if it needs any additional pruning to remove any dead or loose leaves and petals.

Advertisement
05

Placing your flowers in water

Share to Pinterest

Cutting the stems of your flowers can sometimes allow air bubbles to form in the stem. To prevent this from happening, cut your stems underwater. Alternatively, put your flowers into a vase of water immediately after cutting. Room temperature water is best — if it's too hot, it can cook your flowers! Bulbs that flower in cooler months, such as daffodils and tulips, thrive best in water just under room temperature.

Advertisement
06

Choosing the right size vase

Share to Pinterest

It might surprise some people to learn that vase size is an important part of preserving a cut flower arrangement. If the opening is too narrow, the stems may be cramped. On the other hand, if the mouth of the vase is too wide, the vase will swallow your flowers and they may take on too much water. Make sure your vase is clean to prevent the growth of bacteria that could cause your petals and leaves to die off.

Advertisement
07

Feeding your cut flowers

Share to Pinterest

Many floral arrangements come with a small packet of flower food. This is usually just a mixture of sugar, citric acid, and an antibacterial powder. The sugar provides nourishment, the citric acid helps balance the ph, and the antibacterial powder prevents wilting.

If your floral arrangement didn't come with a packet, you can make your own flower food. Mix a few drops of bleach, a sprinkle of sugar, and a crushed vitamin C tablet into the vase water.

Advertisement
08

Sunlight requirements for cut flowers

Share to Pinterest

Freshly cut flowers can use a little bit of sunlight, but do not need a lot. The flowers aren't actively growing anymore, so the rays aren't as beneficial for the bulbs as when they were rooted in the ground. It is best to place your flowers in an area that will receive indirect sunlight.

Advertisement
09

Keep your flowers away from harmful fumes

Share to Pinterest

A lot of scents and fumes floating through the air inside your home can reduce the lifespan of your cut flower arrangement, including cigarette smoke, paint fumes, and hair spray. Even placing flowers near ripe fruit can take away from how long your flowers look beautiful. They produce high levels of ethylene that disrupt the production of the flowers' own ethylene.

Advertisement
10

Place cut flowers in the refrigerator

Share to Pinterest

While no one is admiring your bouquet, such as overnight, go ahead and stick them in the refrigerator. Many people put their fruits and vegetables in the fridge to keep them fresher longer and the exact same ripening-stalling process applies to fresh blooms. This is why florists tend to store all of their flowers in large refrigerators when they are not in use.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Share

Ad
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement